Write your
elevator pitch

Once you have a mission statement written, it’s worth preparing an ‘Elevator Pitch’ for your business.  You never know when you might need to use this so we would recommend this is something you are prepared to ‘present’ without any props or slides or support in anyway.

 

Most genuine opportunities for networking where you can switch people on to your business won’t hit you with notice or a projector and screen, and perhaps that’s better – sometimes that notice can have your mind over-thinking things and make everything seem staged.

 

It should be natural and unscripted, but have structure, purpose and be memorable.  Consider the scenario that you have only 2 minutes with your perfect customer and want him or her to leave you with a clear vision of what your business does and its core values.

 

A great elevator pitch will allow for some interaction - once you’ve told your story, open it up to engage your audience with a question and let them work to continue the conversation and uncover opportunities to work together. An example of this might be if you are a printer and you ask about what types of printed material they use in their business.  Almost every business uses print on some level, so it opens up the opportunity for your pitch to be totally relevant to them.

 

When you have your pitch fine-tuned and you’re happy that it does what you need it to do, practice it repeatedly, until you’re comfortable with the content and can remember all the key points without any notes.

 

Involve your team…

This pitch should come naturally to you, it’s your business driven by your ideas and your vision. But a great exercise for your team is to have each member develop their own version.  Encourage them to learn the basic principles that hold your business together and prepare their own elevator pitch for your company.

 

They’ll be more confident talking about your business if they have a little room to put their own spin on it, so don't focus on having them learn yours word-for-word, allow them freedom and to convey their own translation of your mission statement, perhaps wrapped around an overview of why they work with you and what they love about their job in particular.  Encourage them to take turns in a group setting and talk about what it was about your organisation that appealed to them, and why they took the decision to apply for their particular role.

 

Marketing for Independent Retailers

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